Items tagged with 'Sage'

Bullseye

The Sage Colleges Library shared this photo the other day and it made us smile. It's from a 1937 archery class at Russell Sage College.

The photo is from a collection of Sage archival photos maintained online by the New York Heritage Project. A few more examples: a photo from a circa 1940 auto mechanics class, and working the in the lab during the 1920s.

We're a little disappointed our college education didn't include archery.

An Armory Show

opalka gallery an armory show

We stopped by the Opalka Gallery on the Sage Albany campus today to check out An Armory Show, an exhibition put together by artists Michael Oatman and Ken Ragsdale. Blurbage:

'An Armory Show' is a multi-discipline project, which pays homage to 'The Armory Show' of 1913, held at the 69th Regiment Armory in New York City and presented by the Association of American Painters and Sculptors. The work presented will speak to the dynamic changes that occurred in the art world in general as a result of its occurrence, and to the history of its effect on the artistic life of the Capital Region.
A salon, an exhibition within the installation, will include the work of over 30 artists from the region, including that of RPI faculty Shawn Lawson, Larry Kagan, Nathan Meltz, Paul Miyamoto, and Bill Bergman.

The salon is set up within space created by a drywall facade that resembles a giant tank (complete with turret). It makes the gallery space feel more intimate, and the many of the works of the in the salon -- including illustrations, video, sculpture, collections of small items, one of Heather Dewey-Hagborg's DNA portraits -- prompt you to look closer. It's like of like hanging out inside someone's imagination.

The exhibit just opened this past Friday. It runs through December 15. There's an artists tour with Oatman and Ragsdale October 1 at 5 pm.

Earlier on AOA:
+ Michael Oatman's All Utopia's Fell
+ Peering into Ken Ragsdale's memory

Expo 1920s

flapper dress detail

Detail from a flapper dress.

We generally operate under the assumption that the 1920s had the best clothes. And the decade generally sounds like it was a grand time, what with the those stylish clothes and speakeasies and
new work from Fitzgerald and the atmospheric sound of Victrolas.

And maybe it was, if you were a certain kind of person. Maybe less so if you were a woman or a minority.

The 1920s -- and how different, or similar, they are to day -- are the subject of "Expo 1920s," what looks like an interesting upcoming program from the Rensselaer County Historical Society and Russell Sage College. Blurbage:

Expo 1920s uses fashion, technology and leisure items from the RCHS collection and joint research by Russell Sage College Women's Studies students and RCHS staff to explore the question, are the 1920s so different from today? The program features an expo-style show that will highlight twelve different historic artifacts, from flapper dresses to home appliances, wool bathing suits to linen duster coats that highlight the themes of sexuality, consumerism, privilege and power. A multi-media presentation including historic photographs and music serves as the audio/visual backdrop for the show.
After the expo portion of the event, Dr. Shealeen Meaney, Assistant Professor of English, Director of The Helen M. Upton Center for Women's Studies and Coordinator, American Studies at Russell Sage College, will moderate a Q&A session fostering community dialogue.

The program is April 27 at 7 pm in the Bush Memorial Hall at Sage College in Troy. Tickets are $25 and $35 ($10 for students).

RCHS has shared photos with us of some of the artifacts from the expo. A few are after the jump.

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Milton Glaser exhibit at Opalka Gallery

milton glaser exhibit opalka galleryOpening this week at Sage's Opalka Gallery: "Milton Glaser: In Search of the Miraculous: One Thing Leads to Another" -- a collection of recent work by the famous designer. There's a reception for the exhibit this Friday (November 2), from 5-9 pm.

Glaser has created many designs you'd probably recognize -- maybe most notably the I (heart) NY logo (which he created pro bono for the state, in the back of a taxi).

On November 14, there will be a screening of a documentary about Glaser, To Inform and Delight. The doc's director, Wendy Keys, will also be there. The screening is at 6 pm -- it's $5.

The Opalka Gallery is on the Sage Albany campus, at New Scotland Ave/Woodlawn Ave/S Lake Ave. It's open Monday-Friday 10 am-8 pm, and Sunday noon-4 pm.

This just in: college continues to be expensive

The website Campus Grotto recently released its annual list of the 100 most expensive colleges -- and, as in years past, RPI, Union, and Skidmore are on the list (table above).

Both Union and Skidmore have been sliding down the list over the last few years. For 2008-2009, they were both in the top 20.

Other schools in the greater region that also made this year's list: Bard College (#10, $57,580) Bennington College (#27, $56,990), Williams College (#33, $56,770).

Of course, these totals are like the list price on a car -- not everyone ends up paying that. In fact, at a lot of schools, very few students end up paying full price because of scholarships, grants, and other financial aid.

Campus Grotto notes this school year marks a new era -- for the first time a school's total cost has exceeded $60,000. Sarah Lawrence -- #1 on the total cost chart again -- checks in at $61,236.

St. Rose, Siena, Sage, and UAlbany did not make the top 100 list. Their 2012-2013 total cost figures are post jump.

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Capital Region college president compensation

UAlbany entrance fountain

UAlbany's uptown campus.

When it was announced last week that Robert Jones will become the next UAlbany president, there were a few eyebrows raised about his compensation -- he'll receive a total of $555,000. That includes salary, money from the Research Foundation, and a housing allowance.

That's a lot, no matter what job you're doing. And given that the SUNY system has faced budget cuts recently, it's understandable that the figure would catch attention.

But is it too high? That's a hard question. And people are going to have different answers based on their own perspectives.

To get some context, we pulled data about presidential compensation at UAlbany, RPI, Union, Skidmore, St. Rose, Siena, and the Sage Colleges -- and broke it down to see how it compares across multiple categories.

Here's the result...

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Eight commencement speeches in eight lines

mark sullivan college of saint rose commencement 2012

Mark Sullivan sang during his St. Rose commencement speech. Twice.

We're just about finished with commencement season here in the Capital Region. Pomp. Circumstance. Advice.

Here are eight commencement speech in eight lines (or thereabout):

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Here's your diploma -- and a payment schedule

One of the interesting things in a recent NYT package about student debt is an interactive listing that includes school-by-school breakdowns of the average student debt for each school.

We were a bit surprised by the numbers from Capital Region schools (above). Even though Skidmore and Union College both have expensive sticker prices (both locally and nationally), their average graduate debt figures were among the smallest in this area -- and they had the lowest percentage of grads carrying student debt.

That result probably speaks to a few things about those schools: a) a not insignificant share of the students attending come from families that can help them cover the price and/or 2) many of the students whose families can't cover the cost probably aren't paying the full sticker price. In fact, Union says more than 60 percent of its students "receive some kind of financial assistance."

Contrast that to St. Rose and UAlbany. CSR had the highest average graduate debt -- with 86 percent of its graduates carrying debt. And UAlbany, though having one of the lower debt numbers probably as a result of its relatively inexpensive tuition, had by far the highest debt-to-tuition ratio.

The NYT interactive feature has more info and is worth checking out.

Noted: Americans now owe more in student debt than they do in credit card debt -- the total amount of outstanding student debt in the country is roughly $1 trillion. [USA Today]

Fine print: All the tuition and debt total numbers are for 2010 and via NYT, with one exception: NYT didn't have a tuition number for Union. So we pulled it from College Grotto's rankings for 2009-2010. It appears NYT pulled the numbers from The Project on Student Debt, from which we pulled the "grads with student debt" percentages. The debt:tuition ratio is our own calculation.

Sage Colleges receive another big gift

Lucile Corey Rosenfeld Shea items sage colleges

A few items from Shea's time at Sage.

You know those scenes in movies where a person is approached by an attorney, and the person's all like, "No, not me, I think you have the wrong person..." And then the attorney says, "Your long lost aunt has passed away. And left you a million dollars."

It sounds like that's sort of what happened to the Sage Colleges. The school(s) announced today that it was recently surprised by a bequest from Lucile Rosenfeld Shea, who attended Sage in the 1930s. The amount: $9 million -- one of the biggest gifts in school history.

From the announcement:

The Sage Colleges were notified recently that Lucile Rosenfeld Shea, who attended Russell Sage in 1937 and 1938, willed Sage a bequest valued at more than $9 million. Shea, who most recently lived in a retirement community in North Carolina, had donated modestly to the college during her lifetime and did not reveal the details of her bequest before her death.
A lifelong lover of books, Shea dedicated the gift to benefit the Troy Campus Library. The designation of the gift could not have been more fortuitous, as the library has been identified as a priority need for capital improvements, in anticipation of a centennial campaign for Sage's 100th anniversary in 2016.

We've heard from Sage that Ms. Shea was a very private person, and the school doesn't know much about her life -- her husband passed away in 2003, they didn't have any children. She loved flower arranging and books. (Full press release after the jump.)

This is the second large gift Sage has received recently. In March, Donna Esteves -- the chair of school's board an an alumna -- gave $10 million to the school, the largest gift in its history.

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A new life for the New Scotland Ave Armory?

new scotland ave armory

Waiting for something to do.

Given its location and understated grandeur, it always seemed like the New Scotland Ave Armory in Albany should be able to find some sort of use. And now maybe it is.

The Sage Colleges are in the process of buying the building from the bankrupt research institute that currently owns it, the Biz Review reports. It makes sense -- Sage's Albany campus is literally right next to the building.

The almost-60,000-square-foot armory was built in 1914 and originally housed a cavalry unit. It was deactivated in 1993, and closed in 1999. It's on the National Register of Historic Places. [NYS Military Museum] [National Register]

The now-bankrupt Ordway Institute had bought the building in 2010 with the aim of turning it into an incubator for biomedical startups. That obviously never hatched. [Biz Review]

The New Scotland Ave Armory is part of a generation of about 120 armories built in the state around the beginning of the 20th century. Some of them have been repurposed -- as performance spaces, sports facilities, museums, even a bed-and-breakfast. [SUNY Press]

Others haven't been so lucky. Maybe that shouldn't be surprising -- the buildings are old and big, so anyone taking them on is committing to rather large project. There were no bidders when the state tried to auction the Schenectady Armory last year. It's among a group of armories the state is currently trying to sell as surplus real estate (listing for the Schenectady Armory). The Hoosick Falls Armory in Rensselaer County (designed by Isaac Perry) is also on that list -- the Hoosick town board is considering a deal to buy it for $1. [TU] [Bennington Banner]

Sage Colleges get $10 million gift

russell sage college campus croppedThe Sage Colleges announced today that an alumna -- Donna Esteves '70 -- is giving the school $10 million. It's the biggest gift in school history -- bigger even than the gift from Margaret Olivia Slocum Sage that helped found the college.

The school says it will use the money to renovations projects, as well as build the college's endowment. And, as usually when someone donates a bunch of money to a school, Sage is naming its school of education after Esteves.

So how did Esteves end up in a position to drop this sort of coin on her alma mater?

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Jessica Gahring, from NY Ink, at Sage

jessica gahringCould be interesting: tattoo artist Jessica Gahring -- a resident of Troy who appears on the TLC reality show NY Ink -- will be at Sage Thursday for a talk titled "Talking Back, Speaking Out and Being Humble & Making It Big." (Kind of sounds like a lecture on humblebragging.)

Gahring, a 2004 Russell Sage College grad, told the Troy Record earlier this year that she heard about the show via a former Sage classmate in NYC, and got cast after an interview.

Here's her Facebook page -- she lists Wynantskill as her home. And here's her Twitter stream.

Gahring's talk starts at 7 pm in the Schacht Fine Arts Center on the Sage Troy campus. Tickets for the general public are $10, and will be available at the door.

photo via Jessica Gahring Facebook

The Paper Battery Company

paper battery company flexible sheetAn interesting Troy company announced today it's gotten a $1 million grant from NYSERDA, the state's renewable energy agency. [Paper Battery]

The Paper Battery Company says it's getting the money to build a pilot production line for its "fully printed energy-storage device that is as thin as a piece of paper."

Yep, the company is developing batteries that can be printed onto a paper-like surface.

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Four commencement speeches in four lines

michelle rhee st rose commencement 2011

Michelle Rhee at St. Rose's commencement. Apparently her daughters are not very good at soccer, but they still get trophies. This bothers her.

Commencement was this past weekend for the College of St. Rose, the University at Albany, Siena College, and the Sage Colleges. Here are four of the commencement speeches in four lines (or so):

St. Rose: former DC schools chancellor Michelle Rhee
"We should be striving always to be better or we will never be better. Our country needs to regain its competitive spirit." [St. Rose press release]

UAlbany: alumnus, and Wicked author, Gregory Maguire
"Stories start right out with action. Your story starts today. What will you imagine?" [TU]

Siena: Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
In referring to George Bernard Shaw's remark that youth is wasted on the young: "Please prove Mr. Shaw to be wrong. You are ready for the world now and the world certainly is ready for you, and needs you." [Troy Record]

Sage Colleges: LouAnne Johnson, the teacher and author whose book became the movie Dangerous Minds
While doing an impression of the main character in her book Muchacho: "You don't get the life you got because of being lucky, or poor, or Mexican. You get it because of the way you think about yourself. Because you think you're a loser, you're going to be a loser. If you think you're going to be a success, you gotta set your intention. Like I used to be afraid of being an intellectual because I thought was going to get my ass kicked all the time. But then I figured that's only in school. When you get out of school, people don't kick your ass for being smart -- they give you money." [Sage Colleges video]

Commencements coming up: Skidmore (May 21), RPI (May 28 [corrected]), and Union (June 12).

photo via the College of St. Rose

Mythbuster at Sage Thursday

mythbusters grant imaharaGrant Imahara -- from the show Mythbusters -- will be doing a Q&A at the Sage College campus in Albany this Thursday night.

Imahara is a radio control specialist whose worked on animatronics for a bunch of big action movies. He's also operated R2-D2 from Star Wars -- and programmed the Energizer Bunny (still going, we hear).

The talk starts at 8 pm. It's $7 for the general public, $5 for college students.

photo: Flickr user Sbocaj via Wikipedia

The author Sapphire coming to Sage

sapphire sage posterSapphire -- the author of Push, the novel from which the film Precious (trailer) was adapted, will be giving a talk at the Sage campus in Troy next Thursday (February 25).

Precious opened to widespread acclaim last year (it's been nominated for six Oscars). But Push created its own stir -- because of its subject matter, voice and advance -- when it was first published in 1996.

Sapphire told NPR last year that she based the books on her own experiences as a remedial reading teacher:

The author says that she encountered girls like Precious while teaching -- overweight girls who didn't fit into the confines of our society's beauty paradigm, girls who were essentially "locked out" of the broader culture.
"I wanted to show that this girl is locked out through literacy. She's locked out by her physical appearance. She's locked out by her class, and she's locked out by her color," says Sapphire. "I encountered this. I had a student who told me that she had had children by her father."

The talk starts at 8 pm in Schacht Fine Arts Center on the Troy Sage campus -- there's a screening of Precious at 6 pm (the center is at 1st and Division). Tickets are $5 at the door ($3 for students, free for Sage students).

Sapphire recently spoke to a big crowd at the University of Michigan. We've heard from Sage that they've already changed the talk to a larger venue because of expected attendance.

Education groups sue over state aid, Schumer apologizes to flight attendant, police say stolen Timberlands kicked off chase, Albany councilman calls for cancellation of "Jersey Shore"

A coalition of education groups -- headed by NYSUT -- filed suit against David Paterson yesterday in attempt to eliminate the delay in education aid payments. The coalition argues that Paterson has overstepped his authority -- and the uncertainty created the action is making budgeting difficult. Paterson accused the coalition of trying to be "extra special" interest groups. [TU] [NYT] [Fox23] [Daily Politics]

Saratoga Springs' finance commissioner says the city may have to borrow money to cover the gap created by delayed state aid payments. [Saratogian]

Democrats in the Rensselaer County legislature says three incoming Republicans should not be allowed to serve in both the county legislature and their town boards. One of the incoming Republicans called the practice "totally legal." [TU] [Troy Record]

Richard Daines, New York's health commissioner, got an H1N1 shot during a photo opp yesterday. Even though flu activity in the state is decling, Daines called the flu a "tricky virus" and urged people to still get vaccinated. [CapNews9] [TU] [Fox23]

Chuck Schumer apologized yesterday for calling a flight attendant a "bitch" after she told him to stop talking on his mobile phone. Kirsten Gillibrand was sitting next to him on the plane (and apparently did end her call) and Republicans are now criticizing her for not publicly condemning Schumer's actions. [NYDN] [Politico] [NYT] [Daily Politics]

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How to survive the impending zombie uprising

zombie walk 2009 dodsonHumorist Max Brooks will be at Sage this Wednesday night sharing tips on how to survive a zombie uprising. From the Sage blurb (links and emphasis added):

The Sage College of Albany welcomes Max Brooks, novelist, humorist, renowned Zombie preparedness expert and authority on the truth and myths surrounding the undead. The evening will include a reading from new materials, a chance for audience members to ask questions, followed by a book signing.
Brooks is the best-selling author of The Zombie Survival Guide and World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War. His books outline ways to not only escape a Zombie attack, but shares techniques that allow the reader to defensively prepare for whats to come.

Brooks, who's the son of Mel Brooks, has a new book: The Zombie Survival Guide: Recorded Attacks.

The talk starts at 9 pm in the Kahl Campus Center Gym at the Albany campus on New Scotland Ave. It's $5.

(Thanks, Jess!)

Earlier on AOA: Photos from Zombie Walk 2009

photo: Patrick Dodson

Here's your diploma and congratulatory wave

hand sanitizerThe no-shake graduation is spreading.

First, it was Sage -- and now RPI has succumbed.

From "A Message to Rensselaer Commencement Participants and Guests" by RPI VP William Walker:

In light of the continued national presence of the H1N1 influenza virus, we will adopt a slightly modified process as we distribute diplomas at the Rensselaer Commencement ceremony on May 16. In keeping with our tradition, graduates will be invited to the stage to receive their diplomas and be recognized for their achievements, but we will not engage in the customary handshakes that typically accompany the presentation of the diploma.

While recent reports on the status of the virus from the Centers for Disease Control are encouraging, we believe that the circumstances warrant an abundance of caution to protect the health of all who participate in the ceremony.

The message goes on to urge people who are feeling ill to not attend the ceremony.

Three schools in NYC were closed this week after another flare up of the emerging H1N1 flu.

(Thanks, D!)

Friday's asks state police to look into snake head, parking official's wife's car got ghost tickets, landfill fined for stinkiness, Skidmore students accused of beat down, rooster finds new home, Tulip Queen crowned

TGI Friday's says the an independent lab has concluded that the snake head found in a side order of broccoli at its restaurant in Clifton Park was added after the veggies were cooked. The company says it's asked the State Police to open a criminal investigation. [TU] [AP/Daily Gazette]

GlobalFoundries says it won't buy the land for the Luther Forest chip fab until it can work out an agreement with construction unions -- and David Paterson's office is participating in the negotiations. Even with all the recent hype, the project still has some doubters. [TU] [Biz Review] [TU]

The vehicle registered to the wife of Albany's Parking Violations Bureau director received 70 ghost tickets, according to documents obtained by the TU. Albany treasurer Betty Barnette has said that her office, which includes the parking violations bureau, had no knowledge of the ghost ticket program. [TU]

A federal appeals court has upheld the $265,000 in damages awarded to a man who says an Albany cop violated his civil rights during an arrest in 2002. The cop -- who's had numerous complaints filed against him -- is still on the job. [TU]

Advocates for same-sex marriage have put together a coordinated campaign to lobby potential swing votes in the state Senate. Many senators have yet to say publicly how they'll vote on the issue. [NYT]

The state Senate and its slim Democratic majority have been quite the drama lately as small groups of senators have tried to get theirs by holding out on various bills. And now this: Kevin Parker, a senator from Brooklyn, has been charged with a felony for allegedly wailing on a New York Post photographer -- Parker is, perhaps fittingly, also the sponsor of legislation that would legalize ultimate fighting in the state. [NYT] [NYT] [NYP] [NYP]

Chuck Schumer has asked the Federal Trade Commissioner to look into those "your car warranty is about to expire" scam telemarketing calls. Apparently Schumer had had enough after he got a fourth call on his mobile last week. [AP/TU] [NYT]

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Dalai Lama visits, murder in Albany, too many recyclables in landfill, Friday's says it's investigating snakehead, Sage graduation won't shake on it, fiddlehead rustlers

dalai lama nys senate

The Dalai Lama speaking in the New York Senate.

The Dalai Lama spoke -- very softly -- to a crowd of about 2500 people at the Palace Theater yesterday afternoon. About the controversy surrounding his off-then-on visit, the Tibetan spiritual leader said: "I had an invitation, so I accepted." -- he also implied that negative media reports about the World Ethical Foundations Consortium, the event's sponsor, were not truthful. Earlier in the day, the Dalai Lama spoke before the state Senate and joked that he felt an affinity with Republicans at the Capitol because he knows what it's like to be in the minority. [TU] [Daily Gazette] [TU] [Troy Record] [NYS Senate YouTube]

The Albany County budget is facing a $20 million gap because of falling sales tax income and cuts in state aide. County exec Mike Breslin called the gap -- which represents about 30 percent of the county budget -- "an emergency." [TU]

Police say a man was stabbed and killed on Bradford Street in Albany yesterday evening (map). A suspect is in custody. Another man was shot twice on Third Street later in the night. [CapNews9] [TU] [CapNews9]

A Schenectady County grand jury handed up a 26 count indictment against Steve Raucci, the former Schenectady School District employee accused of arson and terrorism. The indictment alleges Raucci was involved in 14 separate incidents. [TU] [Daily Gazette]

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Paterson to introduce same-sex marriage bill, Gillibrand's absentee ballot challenged, Dalai Lama visit back on, "tea party" in Corning Preserve, local professor salaries ranked

David Paterson reportedly plans to introduce legislation on Thursday that would make same-sex marriage legal in New York State. Paterson says allowing same-sex marriage is "the only ethical way to treat people who want to live together in peace under the civil law." A similar bill has passed the Assembly in previous years, but stalled in the state Senate. Democrats now hold a 32-30 majority in the state Senate, but four Senate Dems say they won't support the bill. The state Senator who plans to sponsor the bill says he thinks some Republicans may cross the aisle to support the measure. [NYT] [AP/Daily Gazette] [NYP] [TU]

The Tedisco campaign has challenged Kirsten Gillibrand's absentee ballot for the 20th Congressional District special election. A Tedisco campaign lawyer said Gillibrand, who appeared in the area with Scott Murphy, should have voted at her polling place in Columbia County. Gillibrand called the challenge "frivolous and without merit." The Tedisco campaign has been focusing their ballot challenges on people who may live part-time in the district, including students from schools such as Skidmore. A attorney for the Murphy campaign says the Tedisco campaign is basing its challenges on whether "the person is likely to vote Democratic." [TU] [Saratogian/Troy Record] [HuffPo] [PolitickerNY] [NYT]

The unofficial count from the NYS Board of Elections had Murphy up 47 votes on Tedisco at the end of yesterday. [NYS BoE]

Albany mayor Jerry Jennings says rumors that he was not going to run for re-election this year were "wishful thinking." He's expected to officially announce his re-election bid next week. [TU]

It looks like the Dalai Lama is coming to Albany, afterall. The Buddhist spiritual leader is now scheduled to appear at The Palace Theater on May 6. [Metroland] [TU]

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Capital Region college tuition

Nott Memorial

Union's Nott the most expensive.

After hearing recently that the cost of attending both Skidmore and Union had crossed the $50k mark, we were curious about how the local colleges stack up when it comes to cost.

So, we looked it up. The list and a few notes are after the jump.

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Stratton talks with Cuomo about getting rid of police force, father charged after whupping, Sundwall off the ballot, CDTA packs 'em in

Brian Stratton met with Andrew Cuomo on Tuesday about the idea of dissolving the Schenectady's troubled police force. Stratton says the AG "wants to help in every way possible." He says one of the options they discussed was the creation of a countywide police force. (Cuomo has lately been pushing for municipalities to consolidate services.) [TU] [Daily Gazette] [Fox23]

The Albany police detective accused of driving drunk through Albany and Bethlehem in January has been indicted on charges of drunken driving and reckless driving. [TU]

Albany schools superintendent Eva Joseph announced yesterday that she's retiring -- she had more than a year left on her contract. [TU]

Albany's city treasurer, Betty Barnette, says the common council's investigation of the ghost ticket scandal is a "witch hunt." Barnette is scheduled to testify before the council next week. [TU]

A Schenectady father has been charged with felony assault after he, in his own words, "whupped" his serially misbehaving 13-year-old son. The father says he "tried the Dr. Phil method," but when that didn't work he "flashed back to old school." [Daily Gazette]

The Three Men in the Room have a reportedly reached an agreement on reform of the Rockefeller Drug Laws. The new laws would give judges the authority to send first time offenders to treatment instead of jail. [NYT]

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The Scoop

Ever wish you had a smart, savvy friend with the inside line on what's happening around the Capital Region? You know, the kind of stuff that makes your life just a little bit better? Yeah, we do, too. That's why we created All Over Albany. Find out more.

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I've found that anecdotes from neighbors, friends, or internet "strangers" can only take you so far. If you haven't already, I strongly recommend you get out there and visit these schools during the school year, during the school day to get a feel for things. In the last few months, my wife and I have made a series of visits to our local elementary, middle + high-school. During those visits, we had the chance to talk to multiple teachers and see the kids "in action". It was very VERY telling in a lot of ways - both good and bad.

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