Items tagged with 'Historic Albany Foundation'

BUILT 2018 call for entries

BUILT 2018 poster card

This year's Historic Albany Foundation BUILT event -- "Albany's Architecture through Artists' Eyes" -- will be at the State Museum November 3.

The annual fundraiser is showcase for work by local artists that's inspired by Albany's built environment. And there's a call for entries (link added):

For the past 17 years, HAF has used this annual art exhibit and silent auction to highlight the built environment of the Capital Region. A portion of the proceeds from the reception and art sales will benefit the Foundation's mission of programming, technical services, and, preservation efforts including the stabilization of 48 Hudson Avenue, Albany's oldest building. BUILT is unique in that it supports the local arts community and preservation initiatives throughout the year. This year's theme revolves around the 40th anniversary of the HAF Architectural Parts Warehouse. Artists are encouraged to submit art made from salvaged, reclaimed and recycled materials. For more information, a prospectus and entry form, artists can visit [the HAF BUILT website]. This year's judges are local artists Peter Leue and Mark Gregory.

This year's poster/card for the event (above) features an Albany mosaic by Karen Schupack.

BUILT is Saturday, November 3 from 6:30-9:30 pm, and will feature food from BMT Hospitality and wine from Capital Wine and Spirits. Tickets are $95 / $55 for attendees under 35 years old.

Historic Albany Foundation Parts Warehouse sale

HAF parts warehouse

The Historic Albany Foundation's Parts Warehouse is having a sale July 21, with a focus window-related pieces. Blurbage:

[A]ll window items - sash, screens, storms, shutters, antique glass and hardware - heavily discounted at 40% in celebration of the Parts Warehouse's 40th anniversary.
The same items are discounted 25% throughout the month of July.
New and renewing members will enjoy an additional 10% discount on the day of the sidewalk sale, and anytime they shop at the Parts Warehouse.
Have questions about historic window repair? We'll have restoration experts on hand to answer your questions, and printed resources available for the taking.

Even if you're not in search of window stuff, the parts warehouse is worth stopping by sometime just to browse and gawk and see what's available. (Another placed like that: The Habitat ReStore.)

The HAF Parts Warehouse will be open Saturday, July 21 from 9 am-5 pm. It's 89 Lexington Ave in Albany.

photo: Akum Norder

Walking tour of Lincoln Park

Albany Lincoln Park from Corning Tower

The Historic Albany Foundation's Walkabout Wednesday series has a walking history tour of Lincoln Park lined up for July 18. Blurbage:

Before Lincoln Park became a park, it was full of breweries and brick factories, manicured country estates, and a notorious squatter's community. The Beaver Kill once ran through its steep ravine, cascading over the Buttermilk Falls. In 1890 the city purchased the area and began the slow process of transforming it into one of Albany's great outdoor spaces. The park includes a landscape designed by noted architect Charles Downing Lay, a stellar WPA-era bathhouse, and layer upon layer of Albany history.

Some of the brewery buildings still remain along the park. And the city is still contending with the history of the Beaver Kill. See also: this short history of the Lincoln Park pool by the Friends of Albany History.

The walking tour meets at the corner of Eagle and State streets (outside the Renaissance) at 5:30 pm on Wednesday, July 18. Tickets are $10 and available online.

HAF has a bunch of these sorts of walking tours coming up over the next few months...

(there's more)

BUILT 2017

BUILT2017 posterHistoric Albany Foundation's annual BUILT event returns to the State Museum this Saturday. Blurbage for the art show/auction/reception:

BUILT promotes awareness of Albany's built environment and raises funds for preservation efforts. For the past 15 years we've used our annual art exhibit & silent auction to highlight the issue of vacant buildings in Albany. With BUILT, we extend this artistic lens not just on vacant architecture, but onto the entire BUILT environment. A portion of the proceeds from the reception and art sales will benefit the Foundation's programming and technical services.

Works by artists inspired by the local built environment will be on display and available for purchase. That link above includes photos from previous years.

BUILT is this Saturday, November 4 from 6:30-9:30 pm. Tickets are $85 / $55 for ages 35 and under and available online.

Albany history, in an app

Tour Albany app screenshots

Screenshots from the app.

Driving through downtown Albany on weekends, Susan Holland has noticed groups of people looking up at the buildings. And as the executive director of the Historic Albany Foundation, she has plenty she could share with them about the history of what they're looking at.

But: "I would look like a freak if I stopped my car and was like, 'Do you want to know about this?'"

Now there's a different option: A new mobile app called Tour Albany that pulls together a bunch of historical info about Albany including maps, building histories, walking tours, and podcasts.

(there's more)

Albany's oldest building has a new face

48 Hudson scrim 2017-06-16

The Van Ostrande-Radliff House at 48 Hudson Avenue in downtown Albany -- which dates back to 1728 -- now has a scrim that depicts how it might have looked back in the long ago day. The new look is part of an effort by the Historic Albany Foundation, which owns the building, to raise money for its preservation and renovation. Blurbage:

Installed on the north side of the building is a large, durable fabric scrim depicting in real size what 48 Hudson Avenue might have looked like at the time of its construction ca. 1728, showing features typical of an urban Dutch dwelling. The rendering is based on research from the historical record conducted by Dr. Charles Gehring and Dr. Janny Venema of the New Netherland Research Center about contemporary houses in Dutch Albany, the Netherlands, and New Netherland, of which Albany was a part from 1614 to 1664, when control of the region was transferred to the English. The building is an example of the persistence of Dutch culture in the Hudson Valley long after the close of the Dutch period, and is a rare link to this foundational period in American history.

Money for the scrim came via the Dutch consulate, as part of an effort to promote Dutch arts and culture in the United States.

Historic Albany figures the whole project preserve and restore 48 Hudson will cost $2 million. It got a grant last year from the state Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation for $268k for the first phase. It needs to raise about $89k as part of its match for the money -- and it's collecting donations online.

Old maps and tracing Lincoln's path

Clip of 1857 Map of Albany by E JacobA couple of upcoming Historic Albany Foundation events that could be interesting:

March 7: Cool Maps of Albany
"Delve into three centuries of Albany history through beautifully executed cartography. Join Deputy County Clerk Craig Carlson & City Historian Tony Opalka for a show-and-tell of the maps housed at the Hall of Records, including one measuring 23 feet!" 5:30 pm -- $10

April 20: Lincoln's Visit to Albany
"On February 18, 1861, President-elect Abraham Lincoln made a historic visit to Albany, NY on his way to Washington, DC for his inauguration. Retrace his steps in a walking tour that will take you from Broadway to East Capitol Park. Learn about the buildings and the people he came in contact with, and how this one day in Albany ultimately tied to events that led to his assassination." And it's being led by none other than Albany Archives. 5:30 pm -- $10

Space is limited for both events and reservations are required (theses sorts of events seem to fill up often): Lisa at 518-465-0876 ext. 14 or info@historic-albany.org.

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