Items tagged with 'people'

Lobbying the Hobby Lobby

jasmine shea hobby lobby

The pics posted by Jasmine Shea on Twitter from a Hobby Lobby in Latham.

Prompted by the Supreme Court's recent decision in the Hobby Lobby case, Jasmine Shea wanted to do something to protest the company's policies on covering birth control for its employees. So Shea decided to visit the Hobby Lobby store in Latham last week to pass out condoms.

Along the way there Shea, who describes her day job as "office worker/comic relief," and a friend decided to add to their protest with a prank: They were going re-arrange the decorative letters sold in the store to spell out the words "pro choice."

It was a relatively small act, but it ended getting a big response after Shea posted pics on Twitter and Instagram. Sites such as Jezebel and Feministing featured the pics, and the act ended up being covered by the Washington Post. And even now, a week later, it's continuing to generate attention.

All that from something that happened in a store Shea says was more or less empty of shoppers.

We bounced Jasmine Shea a few questions this week about why she did what she did, the response it's gotten, and how it compares to other more traditional forms of activism.

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What's up in the Neighborhood

The NeighborhoodAmong the topics in this most recent spin around the Capital Region's online neighborhood: Hoffmany's Playland, fireworks, all the things, snake chasing, Bear Swamp, Black Cat Cafe, a barley burger, Albany New Things, 10 changes, summer enrichment, a bell, and Ethelda Bleibtrey.

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A perspective on Hudson's renaissance

Hudson Gate.jpg

AOA's summer tour is headed to Hudson this weekend, so we thought it'd be fun to have Hudson Week on AOA. Each day we'll be featuring posts about things to do, see, and sample in this city on the river.

Carole Osterink has her eyes on Hudson. The creator of The Gossips of Rivertown -- a blog of news and commentary about the city of Hudson -- has been writing about the city for more than four years, and has observed its evolution over two decades, including some time on the Hudson City Council.

There's been a great deal of change over those 20 years, and while Hudson has only recently made it onto the radar of many people outside the city, she says the "overnight success" has actually bee a long time in the making.

Osterink took some time out this week to answer a few questions and share some of her observations about Hudson's renaissance.

Hudson Week 2014 in-post ad Olde Hudson

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What's up in the Neighborhood

The NeighborhoodAmong the topics in this most recent spin around the Capital Region's online neighborhood: high peaks, the inky night, flower hunting, an elevated highway, chain stores, strawberries, Parivar, Fin, the barge, pie, lunch, and unpremeditated miracles.

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The psychology of Frozen

frozen film posterUnion College psychologists George Bizer and Erika Wells make an appearance in a New Yorker post this week looking at how Frozen ended up being so popular. A clip from the piece by Maria Konnikova:

They organized an evening of "Frozen" fun--screening and movie-themed dinner--and called it "The Psychology of Frozen." There, they listened to the students' reactions and tried to gauge why they found the film so appealing.
While responses were predictably varied, one theme seemed to resonate: everyone could identify with Elsa. She wasn't your typical princess. She wasn't your typical Disney character. Born with magical powers that she couldn't quite control, she meant well but caused harm, both on a personal scale (hurting her sister, repeatedly) and a global one (cursing her kingdom, by mistake). She was flawed--actually flawed, in a way that resulted in real mistakes and real consequences. Everyone could interpret her in a unique way and find that the arc of her story applied directly to them. For some, it was about emotional repression; for others, about gender and identity; for others still, about broader social acceptance and depression. "The character identification is the driving force," says Wells, whose own research focusses on perception and the visual appeal of film. "It's why people tend to identify with that medium always--it allows them to be put in those roles and experiment through that." She recalls the sheer diversity of the students who joined the discussion: a mixture, split evenly between genders, of representatives of the L.G.B.T. community, artists, scientists. "Here they were, all so different, and they were talking about how it represents them, not ideally but realistically," she told me.

There's also some discussion about the always complicated business of princessification.

Another rehabbed building in downtown Troy, and a restaurant for Slidin' Dirty

9 First Street Troy

9 First Street in downtown Troy.

The owners of the popular food truck Slidin' Dirty announced today that they're opening a restaurant in downtown Troy. They're taking the space on the first floor of 9 First Street, a historic building which is currently undergoing a total overhaul that includes residential upstairs.

"We just sort of outgrew the truck," said Tim Tanney, who owns Slidin' Dirty with his wife, Brooke. "This space is going to allow us to do more with the truck, so the truck's not going to miss a beat, and then we're going to have this space."

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What's up in the Neighborhood

The NeighborhoodUpdated

Among the topics in this most recent spin around the Capital Region's online neighborhood: Eve of Destruction, a scam, an outrageous example, garage doors of doom, Round Lake Antiques Festival, Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, The Beast, Lisha Kill Preserve, World of Beer, a disappointing and confusing experience, Mexican Radio, strawberry scones, kebabs, feeling sorry for Eileen, and a new book...

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What's up in the Neighborhood

The NeighborhoodAmong the topics in this most recent spin around the Capital Region's online neighborhood: Father's Day, singing high school students, the weirdest dental experience, Mountain Jam, Big Slide, Albany Comic Con, brunch at the Ruck, Goodnight Noodle, wine, olives, and Whole Foods...

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"Madman"

Check it out: "Madman," a new song by Sean Rowe, embedded above. It's off a new album set for release in September.

The "Madman" video was inspired by the string of house shows Rowe has been playing over the last year. That tour has apparently shifted how the Troy native thinks about things, and prompted him to set up a "pledge" campaign ahead of the new album's release:

The thing that hit me like a brick with this house show tour is how different it made me look at the relationship with my fans and how real it felt to leave the bullshit mentality of the musical mainstream. This Pledge campaign is for us. This is where we can communicate and where you can be a part of my new record and this whole idea that we can really connect with the music.

The campaign -- which strikes us as being a bit like public radio, and a bit like Kickstarter -- is offering pre-orders and other items for sale. Among the premiums: $10 pre-order with early album access, to $200 for Rowe to make a prank call for you, to $1,500 for "the ultimate foraging / house concert extravaganza." (Rowe is an expert wild edibles forager.)

Rowe's house show tour is still rolling along -- in fact, he's set to play a handful of private shows here in the Capital Region this month.

Grace Peak

Grace HudowalskiEast Dix, one of the 46 Adirondack High Peaks, was recently renamed Grace Peak in honor of Grace Hudowalski, one of the original 46ers (she was #9). Here's the mountain on a map.

Hudowalski lived in both Troy and Albany, and Paul Grondahl recently had a nice story about her legacy and what she's meant to many Adirondack hikers.

From an Adirondack Forty-Sixer bio of Hudowalski, in reference to her first hike up Mt. Marcy:

Reflecting on that trip years later she said,
"It was tough. I was on all fours sometimes. I didn't think I was going to get there. But I had to get to the top - there was some reason. God knows what it was but I had to go on. And on the top just for a fraction of a moment, the clouds lifted while I was there and I looked down and there a mile below me was Lake Tear of the Clouds, the Hudson's highest source. And you know, that did something to me. I had seen something - I felt it. I never forgot the mountain and I never forgot that trip."
From that point on she said, "I never talked about anything but mountains. I talked about them, I wrote about them. I gave speeches about them."

Hudowalksi passed away in 2004 at the age of 98.

As Douglas Arnold, the Forty-Sixer who led the effort to name the mountain in honor of Hudowalksi, said to the Syracuse Post-Standard: "Everyone has a mentor, a coach, a parent or grandparent, friend, or teacher who influences the outcome of their life. These angels are remembered but rarely honored. Grace Hudowalksi was a mentor to thousands of people as she shared her enthusiasm for the Adirondacks with everyone."

Earlier on AOA:
+ The Winter 46ers
+ How to hike the High Peaks and not be That Guy

photo via The Adirondack Forty-Sixers

My Exit: Magpie Campbell

My Exit- Magpie Campbell.jpg It's My Exit Monday on WEXT -- The day when, for one hour, a Capital Region listener shares music from their collection with the rest of us.

This week, Magpie collections a wide range of songs...

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Hey there, Jen Wicks, cosplayer

jen wicks cosplay

A few of the costumes created by Jen Wicks.

The Albany Comic Con is this Sunday at the Holiday Inn on Wolf Road. And in addition to all sorts of exhibits and artists, there will also be fans dressed up in costumes depicting some of their favorite comic book or video game characters.

This sort of costume play -- cosplay -- has become a big part of conventions. So we thought it'd be fun to talk with Jen Wicks about it. The Troy resident has been cosplaying for more than a decade in a variety of elaborate and detailed costumes.

As she told us this week: "It's amazing what you can learn about yourself while you're being someone else."

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What's up in the Neighborhood

The NeighborhoodAmong the topics in this most recent spin around the Capital Region's online neighborhood: trails, an island in the lake, Tough Mudder, side trip poutine, Four Fat Fowl, a cooking class, City Beer Hall, ample chicken parm, dodging the news, silver status, and why.

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My Exit: Diane Warde

My Exit- Diane Ward.jpgIt's My Exit Monday on WEXT -- The day when, for one hour, a Capital Region listener shares music from their collection with the rest of us. This week, Diane Ward keeps it (mostly) local, with 518 musicians from a variety of genres.

More about Diane and some of the tunes on her playlist, after the jump.

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What's up in the Neighborhood

The NeighborhoodAmong the topics in this most recent spin around the Capital Region's online neighborhood: the Albany Bear, nature, the Vermont City Marathon, a moment with horses, the inner lumberjack, a photo contest, Yankee Stadium, Rare Form Brewing, fast casual, friday night cookout, Natural Way Cafe, the Hudson Berkshire Wine and Food Festival, breakfast sandwiches, things uncontrollable, and shinney.

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My Exit: Bill Olsen

My Exit Bill Olsen.jpgIt's My Exit Monday on WEXT -- the day when one listener spends an hour sharing favorites
from their own music collection.

This week, Bill Olsen pulls some favorites from Bowie, Stevie Wonder and Steely Dan, among others.

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My Exit: Dave & Kelly

My Exit Dave and Kelly.jpg

This week's My Exit DJs, Kelly and Dave.

We usually post these on Mondays, but we had a hiccup because of the holiday. But you can catch the show Saturday morning at 8 am.

My Exit is WEXT's program that allows listeners to spin their favorite tunes for an hour each week. It's a chance for the rest of us to discover what's on someone else's iPod. Sometimes you'll find something new, and other times you'll rediscover old favorites.

Tonight on WEXT's weekly show where listeners spin the tunes for an hour, return DJ Dave Schoch shares the mic with Kelly de la Rocha.

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UAlbany's Thompson brothers win college lacrosse's top trophy

thompson brothers tewaaraton award

This is great: Miles and Lyle Thompson -- brothers on UAlbany's men's lacrosse team -- won the Tewaaraton Trophy last night (the trophy is like the Heisman for college lacrosse). The Thompsons are both the first co-winners of the award, and the first Native Americans to win the award. [UAlbany sports] [Lacrosse Magazine] [Syracuse Post-Standard]

Said Lyle in a tweet: "Words can't explain how happy I am to not only get this award but to share it with my brother."

The Thompsons had a tremendous season for the Great Danes, who had the nation's highest-scoring offense. The brothers both broke the NCAA record for points in a season. And Miles led the nation in goals per game. (Their cousin, Ty Thompson, also quite a season for the Great Danes.)

Lacrosse was invented by Native Americans, and the sport still has an important place in many Native American communities, especially here in New York. That the Thompsons -- from the Onondaga Nation near Syracuse -- are the first Native Americans to win the Tewaaraton Trophy makes their accomplishment even more significant. (Tewaaraton is the Mohawk name for lacrosse.)

UAlbany finished the season 12-6, exiting the NCAA tournament in the quarterfinals in an overtime loss to eventual national runner-up Notre Dame.

Earlier and elsewhere:
+ Trick shot and a goal
+ NYT: In a Native American Sport, a Family's Giant Leap
+ NPR: In College Lacrosse, Two Brothers Flirt With Making History

photo: Tewaaraton Award

A giant check for the AOA Startup Grant winner

startup2014 giant check

From left to right: Dan Ciampino from Staff Ciampino; Heather Lashway, Berkshire Bank senior VP of product and designs; Sara Mae Hickey from Puzzles Bakery & Cafe; Mary Darcy from AOA; Justin Priddle, Berkshire Bank VP, Relationship Manager; Karen Mason, Berkshire Bank branch manager.

You know what's fun? Giving someone a giant check.

Sara Mae Hickey from Puzzles Bakery & Cafe -- the winner of this year's AOA Startup Grant -- was awarded the giant check for $1,500 today from the sponsors of the contest, Berkshire Bank and Staff Ciampino & Company P.C., Certified Public Accountants. (She also got smaller, actual check so she wouldn't have to try to deposit the giant check -- though, you know, that could be fun, too...)

And there was a bonus prize! Staff Ciampino also awarded Puzzles a year of free consulting and accounting services!

It was great to see Sara Mae and hear about the progress on Puzzles. She said they're currently finishing off some construction work and waiting on some kitchen equipment. The bakery/cafe on State Street in downtown Schenectady is aiming for a soft open this July.

Speaking of bonus prizes... The Albany Colonie Regional Chamber of Commerce and the Community Loan Fund of the Capital Region both stepped in after this year's finals to offer the two runners-up -- Raya's Raw and Cultured and The Rise and Shine Company -- entrepreneurship classes. Thanks to those two organizations!

Thank you to everyone who helped out with this year's contest, including Janet Tanguay at the Chamber for her coaching services, and our judges -- Lissa D'Aquanni from the Community Loan Fund, Blake Hanan from Mealo, and Rhea Drysdale from Outspoken Media. And thank you again to this year's contest sponsors Staff Ciampino & Company P.C., Certified Public Accountants and Berkshire Bank.

startup contest 2014 sponsor ad staff ciampinoStartup2014 Berkshire Bank in-post ad

The Albany Colonie Regional Chamber of Commerce advertises on AOA.

What's up in the Neighborhood

The NeighborhoodAmong the topics in this most recent spin around the Capital Region's online neighborhood: joys of cycling, bringing the L-Ken's sign back to life, not voting, Vent, Pyramid Lake, Plotterkill, a bridge gone, meetup sushi, food truck happy hour, a Thai restaurant, Sunday Supper, an Albany favorite, carpaccio love, spiedies, and a hotter otter.

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Rare Form Brewing Company

Rare Form tap room

Rare Form's tap room/brewery space, which was being prepped on Tuesday.

The new Rare Form Brewing Company in Troy is set to open its doors this Friday. The startup craft brewery is the result of a long-running plan by married couple Kevin Mullen and Jenny Kemp, who moved to the Capital Region after stops in Denver and Seattle.

Rare Form's opening also marks the ongoing transformation of its block at Congress St and 4th Street, which over the next few months four new storefronts are planned -- the sort of change that has a lot of people optimistic about the future of Troy.

We stopped by this week to get a look at what's in the works, and talk with some of the people involved.

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What's up in the Neighborhood

The NeighborhoodAmong the topics in this most recent spin around the Capital Region's online neighborhood: criticism, stop signs, workforce challenging, Opus 40, Garrison Keillor, chain restaurants, Fresh Market, a pho tour, Reel Seafood, Boca Bistro, mini hot dogs, the earliest merchants of Troy, wildflowers, and when they were young.

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Eat Good Food

Eat Good Food truck exterior

By Lauren Hittinger

John and Jean Travis had run two successful restaurants, including the former Jonesville Store in Clifton Park, before getting into the food truck business three years ago with the Eat Good Food truck. The transition hasn't always been easy -- a sign on their truck reads: "The only thing more overrated than natural childbirth is the joy of owning your own business."

Even so, the experience has the Travises sticking to their core principles of serving fresh food made to order -- while having fun doing so. And along the way they've found success teaming up with other food trucks.

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Visions of a Capital Region after us

john_bulmer_reclaimed_Capitol

From John Bulmer's Reclaimed series.

By Lauren Hittinger

Have you ever wondered what the Capital Region would look like if everyone just disappeared? Whether it was from zombie apocalypse or mass exodus, the landscape would certainly change if we weren't around to mold and maintain it.

Photographer John Bulmer has taken this idea and turned it into two series of remarkable of photo illustrations. His Reclaimed series imagines an abandoned Capital Region landscape after a catastrophic situation. The Dark City series is a little more peaceful, imagining how our region would look at night without artificial light from sources such as buildings and streetlights.

The images in both series are eerily believable.

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My Exit: Christopher Lane

My HipstaPrint 0.jpg

Tonight's My Exit DJ, Christopher Lane

It's Monday -- time to add to your music collection, or at least connect over music you already love, on WEXT's My Exit. Once a week Exit 97.7 gives an hour of airtime over to a listener to share some of their favorite music.

Details on this week's DJ and some of his favorites, both national and local...

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The Scoop

Ever wish you had a smart, savvy friend with the inside line on what's happening around the Capital Region? You know, the kind of stuff that makes your life just a little bit better? Yeah, we do, too. That's why we created All Over Albany. Find out more.

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