The last week's worth of items on AOA

Today's moment of spring

tulip bed in front of Capitol

There are a going to be a lot of tulip photos over the next few weeks.

It's just the way it's going to be.

Where the new homes have been built

Halfmoon Community Growth Profile new homes map

Parcels in the town of Halfmoon on which new single-family homes were built between 1995 and 2015. / map: Capital District Transportation Committee and the Capital District Regional Planning Commission

The Capital Region county that's the most different from the other three core counties? That's probably Saratoga County. And here's (another) bit toward that case...

Of all the single-family homes built in the Capital Region core between 1995 and 2015, almost half were in Saratoga County.

That's from the Capital District Transportation Committee and the Capital District Regional Planning Commission, which have posted a series of new "community growth profiles" for each of the core's 56 cities and towns:

Between 1995 and 2015, more than 35,111 single family homes were built in the four county Capital District Region on lots totaling 55,928 acres. The majority of single family home growth occurred in Saratoga County with 49% followed by 25% in Albany, 15% in Rensselaer, and 10% in Schenectady. As of 2015, there are 209,730 single family homes and 378,947 housing units overall in the region. And, approximately 214 miles of new roads were built between 2005 and 2015, of which 21% included sidewalks.

The town of Halfmoon is a prime example of the population and housing growth in Saratoga County. Between 1990 and 2015, the town went from 6,125 housing units to 11,060 units, according to its profile.

(there's more)

Williamstown Theatre Festival 2017

Williamstown Theatre Festival 2017 poster

The updated slate of shows for this summer's Williamstown Theatre Festival is out. As usual, the casts include actors you'll recognize, such as Jane Kaczmarek, S. Epatha Merkerson, Jayne Atkinson, and Cristin Milioti.

In recent years WTF has also served as a launching point for new shows, some of which make their way to Broadway.This summer's schedule includes four world premieres, as well as a new play and a new musical.

Also: Single-show tickets are now available for pre-order online. (You can also save some money per ticket by buying tickets in multiple show bundles.) Many of these performances sell out, so if you're interested in going, it's a good idea to buy tickets sooner rather than later.

Here's the lineup...

(there's more)

What's up in the neighborhood

The NeighborhoodAmong the topics in this most recent spin around the Capital Region's online neighborhood: wildflowers, the luxury of carpet, Lincoln's funeral train, Rebecca Rhino, church history, an old Albany dairy, a question from a contractor, the Albany Craft Beer Festival, seasonal burger stands, restaurant coupons, Terra kitchen, taco happy hour, many steps, working through mental illness, distant family, and being part of a new thread.

HWFC_studentsenior_525x80.gif

CDPHP in-post ad 17-3075 Insights Online Ad 525x80

(there's more)

Upbeat on the Roof 2017

Allyson and Whitney Smith from Cannon the Brave

Allyson and Whitney Smith from Cannon the Brave. They're on the schedule in August.

Free summer concert season approaches...

The Upbeat on the Roof series is returning to The Tang Museum at Skidmore later this summer -- and on a new day of the week. The roof-top concerts are moving from Fridays to Thursdays.

Museum explanation blurbage: "The move to Thursday nights coincides with the Museum's new year-round hours. The galleries are open Tuesday through Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. with extended hours until 9 p.m. on Thursday. This move will give visitors a chance to visit the galleries before and after UpBeat concerts."

This year's lineup is below. As usual, it includes local acts across a range of genres.

(there's more)

Witnesses testify to cocaine use in Lake George boat crash trial, deliberations underway in bus attack trial, wreck claims life of 18-year-old Coeymans man, state delays Albany budget report again

Lake George boat crash trial
Jurors in the Alexander West trial on Tuesday heard from two women who testified they snorted cocaine on with West in the hours before the fatal boat crash that killed an 8-year-old girl, but it was left unclear how much cocaine West consumed or exactly how much he had to drink before the crash.[TU][Gazette]

UAlbany bus incident trial
Deliberations are underway in the UAlbany bus attack trial. In closing arguments the defense claims his clients, the women who claimed they were attacked, were acting in self defense, and asked the jury to remember the questions of racial bias in the case, while prosecutors say the video in the case shows it is not a question of racial bias, but truth.[Gazette][TU]

18-year-old killed in Albany County wreck
An 18-year-old man Coeymans man was killed and his passenger injured after their car crossed into oncoming traffic and hit a Freightliner tractor on River Road in Bethlehem. [Gazette][TU]

CDPHP in-post ad 17-3075 Insights Online Ad 525x80

NinePin525inpost.jpg

(there's more)

The old observatory

Dudley Observatory Albany South Lake

Speaking of observatories... Albany had an observatory. In fact, the observatory still exists... just not in Albany.

The Dudley Observatory was once located at different spots in the city of Albany -- in north Albany, and then on the triangle of land between New Scotland Ave, South Lake, and Myrtle. (The Capital District Psychiatric Center is there now.)

That photo above is from the former observatory building on South Lake. From The Dudley's history blog, Counting Stars:

The second building is Dudley's most famous, and it was one of the most iconic buildings in Albany at the time. It showed up in postcards and maps of the era. It was an imposing Romanesque structure of red brick, two stories tall with an observatory tower at the western end. To the east was the residence of the director and temporary housing for visiting astronomers. In the center were the rooms for the computers, the library and the rooms for the resident astronomers.

And those computers? People -- usually women. (Yep, like in Hidden Figures.)

The observatory sold the building to Albany Med in the 1960s (it later caught on fire), and moved to an office on Fuller Road. It's now located at miSci in Schenectady.

photo via The Dudley Observatory

Tracking trucks in Albany's South End

South Pearl Street Albany truck

South Pearl Street last summer.

People in Albany's South End have long been calling for attention and resources to focus on air quality and other environmental health issues in the neighborhood. And there's a project coming up that's using an interesting tool to study truck traffic along the South Pearl Street corridor -- one of the factors related to air quality.

The city of Albany and the Capital District Transportation Committee will be using automatic license plate readers to better understand how trucks move through the neighborhood. From a CDTC press release:

Instead of assigning people to record license plate numbers at several locations for 24 hours a day for 1-2 days, this survey will install and use automatic license plate readers (ALPRs) over a longer period of time to obtain the same data, in greater quantity with more reliability.
The goal of the survey is to identify truck travel patterns and generators, and to develop possible alternative routes. The data collected will only be used for these purposes. ...
The study area will be bounded on the north by the intersection of Green Street and 4th Avenue, on the west by South Pearl Street, on the south by the City of Albany boundary, and on the east by Smith Boulevard and Church Street in the Port of Albany. The ALPRs will be installed at 6 intersections in this area. The project is expected to be completed in September 2017 with a final report.

CDTC will be working with a company called FES Installations to study the data generated by the 15 license plate readers.

This is a different sort of use for the technology that the one for which it's been most famous in recent years: Law enforcement agencies have made extensive use of license plate readers over the past decade, scooping up huge amounts of data about where vehicles have been spotted, including here in New York State. That's prompted debates about how the tech should -- or should not -- be used, and some of the civil liberties and ethics issues involved. [Democrat and Chronicle] [TU] [The Atlantic]

"People talk about the beer like it's got f------ unicorns in it."

Over at Longreads, there's a profile of the famed Vermont beer Heady Topper and how it came to be. But the part we found most interesting was the section about the business philosophy of the owners of the beer's brewery, The Alchemist: "Our goal is not to retire on a mountain of money. Our goal is to create a sustainable example of what a business can be. You can be socially responsible and still make more money than you need." [Longreads]

Capital Region Homebuyer Fair 2017

home for sale signThe Capital Region Homebuyer Fair will be at the Albany Public Library's Washington Ave Branch this Saturday, April 29. What's it include? Blurbage:

+ Meet lenders, realtors, home inspectors and homeownership advisors.
+ Attend workshops on mortgage qualifying, how to build a strong credit score, and down payment programs
+ Obtain a free credit report and consultation to increase your score.
+ Meet with a mortgage lender to get pre-qualified for a loan

The workshops and exhibits are Saturday from 10 am-2 pm. It's free to attend.

The Affordable Housing Partnership advertises on AOA.

How should we respond when someone is being clearly inappropriate in public?

supermarket carts lined upThis question comes from Greg, but we'll block quote it in standard Ask AOA format:

I was in line at the supermarket this past weekend when the guy in front of me got upset with the cashier and flipped out. The details involved a pack of cigarettes, a Coinstar voucher, and a roll of the quarters. From my view, it seemed like the kind of thing that would usually prompt, at most, mild irritation in someone.
The cashier appeared to be from south Asia -- she had an accent -- and I got the impression she was relatively new on the job. As things escalated, I was basically trying to divert my attention -- oh, look, magazines -- until I heard the guy say "THIS IS AMERICAN CURRENCY" while holding up the roll of quarters. And there was something about the tone that wasn't just frustration -- it was condescending and hostile.
Now I'm staring straight at the guy, and I think other people up front are doing the same thing. The manager comes over and I give her a lot of credit -- she firmly tells the guy not to talk to the cashier like that and she completes whatever transaction he was trying to accomplish. He's still upset, though, and huffs as he walks away.
I'm up next and the cashier is visibly flustered. I commiserate with her, and tell her if she needs to take a minute, it's totally understandable. She shakes it off and checks out my stuff. We joke a little bit. Her composure was admirable.
So, here's a question I had after all that: What should a bystander do in that situation?
Even though this guy was being completely inappropriate, my instinct was to not get involved out of concern that would escalate the situation. And though there was a moment early on where the direction of the encounter was unclear, the manager quickly had it handled after she came over.
I guess I wonder if we all have some responsibility in those situations to make sure we're not making it seem like it's OK to act like that. Is silence a form of tacit acceptance? Is there a good way to communicate a healthy social norm about the way people should be treated?

These sorts of situations are hard, and the right thing to do might vary depending on the details. But if you have thoughts to share, we'd like to hear them.

Siena looks to the heavens

siena roger bacon observatory rendering

A rendering of the planned observatory.

Something to watch for: Siena is building a new observatory that it says will house the area's largest telescope. Work is scheduled to start this summer on the college's Loudonville campus and it's aiming for the telescope to be up and running this fall.

Press release blurbage:

The permanently-mounted telescope will be housed in a 16-foot structure atop Roger Bacon Hall, topped by a rotating dome with a retractable opening. The telescope will feature a 27-inch diameter mirror that can be remotely controlled via the internet.
The telescope will allow eyepiece observing of such favorites as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn's rings, and will have sophisticated imaging that will be used to track near-Earth asteroids and to follow the fading light of exploding stars, according to [physics professor] Dr. [Rose] Finn. In addition, a spectrograph will allow for analysis of the chemical composition of stars, nebulae and galaxies.
The observatory won't be used by just physics and astrophysics faculty and students - Dr. Finn said that more than 30 percent of Siena students take Introduction to Astronomy as a liberal arts elective, and they will be able to use the telescope as well.
Students and faculty will use the observatory for their coursework and research, and public observing sessions will be held throughout the year.

Siena got a $467,402 grant for the project from a foundation.

Other observatories
Two other observatories in the area:
+ The Dudley Observatory at miSci, which hosts all sorts of events and classes, including star parties with telescopes. (See also its blog)
+ The Hirsch Observatory at RPI often offers public viewing sessions on Saturday nights.

image via Siena

Jon Batiste at Skidmore

musician Jon Batiste

Jazz musician and bandleader Jon Batiste will be at Skidmore's Zankel Center for a show July 6. Tickets are on sale now -- they're $30.

Batiste will be joined by his band, Stay Human. Blurbage: "As bandleader on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, Jon Batiste is known for soulful performances which often include his signature melodica (a hybrid harmonica and keyboard instrument) as well as engaging 'social music' experiences, involving audience participation and occasional impromptu street parades."

The show is part of the Stewart's Signature Series at Skidmore, which the college says will include "five world-class performances" this summer. Also part of the series: Manhattan Transfer on May 13 -- tickets are $45 and up.

Defendants testify in UAlbany bus incident trial, emotional testimony in Lake George boat crash trial, giving birth along the Thruway

UAlbany bus incident trial
Ariel Agudio and Asha Burwell took the stand in the trial Monday and continued to stick with their version of events during the incident. And the connotation of the word "ratchet" continued to be at issue, with Agudio asserting it had a racist tone as used: "In that situation, I feel like she only said it because we were black." And Burwell said she heard someone use the "n" word. [TU] [Spectrum] [WNYT]

Lake George boat crash trial
Courtney McCue -- the mother of Charlotte McCue, the 8-year-old who died in the crash -- testified Monday and broke down while answering questions about that night: "I looked to my left and Charlotte wasn't moving. She wasn't responding. She was really hurt." McCue also detailed the serious injuries she sustained, including a fractured spine. And when she was shown a picture of her injured leg: "That's where my daughter's head was when it was crushed." [Daily Gazette] [WNYT] [TU] [Spectrum] [Post-Star]

CDPHP in-post ad 17-3075 Insights Online Ad 525x80

NinePin525inpost.jpg

(there's more)

Many sunsets, one skyline

john bulmer albany skyline sunset composite

Check out this composite photo of Albany skyline sunsets by local photographer John Bulmer. After he shared it on Twitter recently, we asked him if it's available for sale as a print and it is -- just contact him via his website.

You might remember John from his post-apocalyptic photo illustrations of Capital Region landmarks.

Dining Out for Life 2017

dining out for life 2017The annual Dining Out for Life event returns this Thursday (April 27) at restaurants all around the Capital Region. The event is a fundraiser for the Alliance for Positive Health (formerly the AIDS Council of Northeast New York).

The event has a fiendishly-complicated setup. Here all the steps:

1. Go out to eat at one of the participating restaurants.

2. There is no step two.

Yep, that's it. The participating restaurants will donate a portion of their checks from that day to the Alliance. You don't have do anything else. Well... you could also make a donation while you're there or later on. There will be envelopes at the restaurants. Look for one of the Alliance ambassadors if you don't see them.

Here's the list of participating restaurants -- many of participating for both lunch and dinner.

Some of the restaurants get busy that night, so reservations are a good idea.

Alabama Shakes at The Palace

Alabama Shakes

The blues rock band Alabama Shakes is set to play a show at The Palace August 1. Tickets go on sale this Friday, April 28 -- they're $39.50 and up.

It's only been about five years since the band's first full length album, but in that time they've hit #1 on the album chart, sold a bunch of records, and won a handful of Grammys.

The opener for the show at The Palace is Emily King.

photo: David McClister

Signs from the Albany March for Science

Albany March for Science crowd

Thousands of people gathered in West Capitol Park Saturday for the Albany Science March event to rally support for research funding and evidence-based public policy on issues such as climate change. (Here's more about the motivation for the event.) It was one of many related marches around the country.

As with most events likes this, many of the people at the Capitol had signs. Unlike most events like this, many of those signs involved mathematical puns or other nerdy references and jokes.

Here are a bunch of those signs, along with a handful of photos from the event...

(there's more)

Amtrak's future

Over at NYT, a look at the decaying rail infrastructure in the Northeast and Amtrak's perpetual funding crunch: "Today, Amtrak finds itself at a crossroad: Is the 46-year-old national railroad at the cusp of a new era of investment as it pushes to build a train tunnel between New York and New Jersey -- one of the country's largest infrastructure proposals -- or will service deteriorate to levels that could damage the economy in the corridor between Washington and Boston?" [NYT] Earlier: The plan for a new NYC train station. (For real this time. Probably.)

Drawing: Champagne on the Park 2017

champagne on the park 2017 poster image

Drawing's closed! Winner's been emailed!

The annual Champagne on the Park event will be back in Albany's Washington Park May 11. The party -- which is set up near the tulips beds in the park -- includes live music, food from Lark Street-area businesses, drinks, and of course, champagne.

We have a pair of tickets to the event, and we're giving them away. Maybe to you.

To enter the drawing, please answer this question in the comments:

What's something of your local list of spring things to do?

Maybe it's getting ice cream from a seasonal stand. Maybe it's taking in the tulips. Maybe it's planting your community garden plot. Maybe it's whatever. We'll draw one winner at random and that person gets the pair of tickets.

Champagne on the Park 2017 is Thursday, May 11 starting at 6 pm. Early bird tickets are currently $70 per person and available online -- the price increases to $80 on May 4. The event is a fundraiser for the Lark Street BID.

BUT WAIT, THERE'S MORE: The winner of the drawing will also get a CDTA Navigator card pre-filled with $20. (That'll get you to and from the event with plenty leftover for a bunch of additional bus rides.)

Important: All comments must be submitted by 11:59 pm on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 to be entered in the drawing. You must answer the question to be part of the drawing. (Normal commenting guidelines apply.) One entry per person, please. You must enter a valid email address (that you check regularly) with your comment. The winner will be notified via email by noon on Wednesday and must respond by noon on Thursday, April 27.

Reviewing allegations of police brutality in Schenectady, retail crunch ripples hit local municipal budgets, legislature looking at allowing booze at movie theaters

Schenectady police
Brendan Lyons reviews recent allegations of police brutality in Schenectady: "Interviews with people involved in violent encounters with Schenectady police, and a review of videos and court records, raise questions about whether the department began slipping back to its old ways in recent years." [TU]

Fatal Schenectady fire
The Schenectady Fire Department says one person died in a fire on Green Street overnight (map). Four others were able to escape. SFD is investigating the cause. [Daily Gazette] [TU] [News10]

UAlbany bus incident trial
Friday included testimony from two alleged victims in the bus incident, along with 11 other students who had been on the bus that night. [Spectrum] [TU]

Lake George boat crash trial
+ Friday included testimony from eight witnesses, including an off-duty detective who said he watched and heard the scene when Alexander West's boat docked following the crash. [Daily Gazette]
+ Robert Gavin considers the testimony of Cara Mia Canale -- "straight out of central casting -- from a 'Cheech & Chong' movie" -- and whether it helped or hurt the prosecution. [TU]

CDPHP in-post ad 17-3075 Insights Online Ad 525x80

NinePin525inpost.jpg

(there's more)

The week ahead

Circus 1903 touring show elephant puppets

A show called Circus 1903 -- featuring elephant puppets made by the same people who did the horse puppet for War Horse -- is at Proctors this week.

Here are a few things to keep in mind, look forward to, or keep busy with this week, from the weather (May approaches), to stories and crafts, to the cosmic, to circus, to dance, to science and history, to all sorts of music...

(there's more)

A quick recap of the week

week review 2017-04-21

Here are a few highlights from the past week on AOA:

+ We gave away front-row tickets to see Neil deGrasse Tyson at Proctors by asking: What's your favorite Capital Region star?

+ A few bits about what's up with the food hall planned for the Warehouse District in Albany.

+ Deanna says it's worth seeking out Emmanuel Thai (get the Massaman curry).

+ A few pics from the first roller derby game in the Albany Capital Center.

+ The details on the latest program aimed at chipping away at the number of vacant buildings in Albany.

+ What was up in the Neighborhood this week: feeling deeply, melon tweaking, women-owned businesses, budgeting, Queen Beatrix's return, animal dentistry, the church that was in a factory, the floral floodgates, Good Friday at the cathedral, a cat cafe, local spirits, and the Spirit of Life.

+ There's a call to customize Nipper (well, smaller versions of Nipper).

+ We talked with one of the organizers of this weekend's Science March in Albany about the motivation for the event and the intersection of science and politics.

+ A quick look at the new Tara Kitchen location in Troy (it's now open).

Here's the whole week in one place.

Thanks to everyone who posted a comment or shared an idea this week!

Today's moment of spring

daffodils 2017

Tulips get all the pub for their Dutch connections here. But as we've mentioned before, the word "daffodil" probably comes from Dutch (or at least by way of Dutch), in part because the Netherlands were a source for the bulbs.

Alfred Hitchcock. Saratoga Springs. Rocking chairs.

Alfred HitchcockSarah pointed this out on Twitter this week and something about it is just kind of oddly funny: Alfred Hitchcock visited Saratoga Springs in 1937 and took note of... the rocking chairs. From Donald Spoto's The Dark Side Of Genius: The Life Of Alfred Hitchcock (emphasis added):

The Hitchcock's American holiday proceeded with considerable public fanfare. The night after the dinner at the 21 Club, Hitchcock was interviewed on the New York radio program "Gertrude of Hollywood," where he overwhelmed his questioner with comparative facts and figures about the English and American film industries. Next morning, leaving their daughter in Joan Harrison's care, Hitchcock and Alma left alone for a two-day trip to Saratoga Springs, New York. "There it all was," he said afterward, "Houses with verandahs. And rocking chairs. Actually rocking chairs, with people rocking in them. I pointed them out to my wife and we stood and looked at them. If we have rocking chairs in England it is only as curiosities. But here you have them real life as well as in the movies." These bits of Americana impressed him, as did the rhythms of American dialect, and he carefully placed them all under the bell jar of his prodigious memory, where they later provided him with the signs of an easy familiarity that character of his best American films."

A few paragraphs earlier there's mention that, during his visit, Hitchcock indulged daily in two American delicacies: ice cream and steak -- he had ice cream for breakfast, and steak for lunch and dinner. While at the 21 Club, he had reportedly ordered three steaks, each followed by a serving of ice cream.

[via @SarahAllenTV]

Capital Region Bike to Work Challenge 2017

Madison Ave bike lane

The annual Capital Region Bike to Work Challenge returns May 19, which aims to promote cycling a mode of commuting. And, as the name implies, it's also a competition, organized by the Capital District Transportation Committee (CDTC) and Bikeatoga:

In each county, the winning team for each of four categories will win a trophy, relinquished by last year's winners and originally contributed by Bikeatoga, Albany Bicycle Coalition, and Troy Bike Rescue, and made out of used bicycle parts. The four categories are
+ Organization with the largest number of riders,
+ Small organization with the highest percent participation (20 or fewer employees),
+ Large organization with the highest percent participation (over 20 employees), and
+ Person who rode the farthest.
The Municipal Challenge is on again this year, for the highest percent participation for any municipality in the region in which the mayor or supervisor rides to work.

As we've mentioned before, biking -- like walking or taking the bus -- to work might seem to be impractical or a big hassle if you don't do it often. But once you start it quickly becomes normal and something you might even look forward to.

Also: It might help you live longer. [BBC]

Stuff to do this weekend

Capital District Grownup Egg Hunt

The Capital Region Grown Up Egg Hunt is in Albany this year.

So. Much. Stuff. To. Do!

We're looking at a busy weekend in the Capital Region -- comedy, beer, science, music, theater and a grown-up egg hunt to name a few.

Our weekend picks can be found after the jump. Doing something you don't see on our list? Drop it in the comments so the rest of us can take a look. And whatever you're up to, have a fantastic weekend!

CDPHP in-post ad 17-3075 Insights Online Ad 525x80

NinePin525inpost.jpg

AOA_525x80_April.jpg

(there's more)

UAlbany bus incident trial focuses on the word "ratchet," remembering Sol Greenberg, AG says local architect wasn't actually an architect, a decade of the Veggie Mobile

UAlbany bus incident trial
+ A main topic of questioning and witness testimony at the trial Thursday: whether anyone heard racial slurs used on the bus, and what their understanding of the connotations of the term "ratchet" were. [TU] [Spectrum]
+ Among the witnesses called was a UAlbany police detective, who was asked by Aasha Burwell's attorney whether it was his job to "track down any aspect of the case to see if there was a racial component" and responded: "I don't know if it was my job. My job was to find the truth of what happened." [WNYT]

Lake George boat crash trial
Cara Mia Canale, a passenger in Alexander West's boat, testified for the prosecution Thursday that she witnessed West drinking and taking drugs throughout the day of the crash -- and that she had also taken drugs. And of the crash itself: "We hit something extremely hard...I remember kind of going airborne almost and coming down in the water." West's attorney challenged Canale on cross examination, asking her if she was on drugs at the moment -- Canale said no -- and questioning why she had changed her initial story from the day. [TU] [News10] [WNYT] [Daily Gazette] [Spectrum]

Sol Greenberg
Remember Sol Greenberg, the longtime Albany County DA who died this week at age 95. [TU]

CDPHP in-post ad 17-3075 Insights Online Ad 525x80

NinePin525inpost.jpg

(there's more)

Tara Kitchen Troy is now open

Tara Kitchen Troy exterior

The Troy location of the popular Moroccan restaurant Tara Kitchen is now open at 172 River Street (the block between State and Congress). Its first day was last Friday. There are a handful of photos after the jump.

This is the second location for the restaurant, started by Aneesa Waheed and Muntasim Shoaib. Their first restaurant space is on Liberty Street in downtown Schenectady, where they've won many fans. Before opening in Schenectady, they sold from a booth at the Troy and Schenectady farmers markets.

Tara Kitchen also makes a lineup of jarred sauces -- you might have seen them in local supermarkets. We've tried a jar of the apricot and prune sauce. It made for a few tasty dinners at home.

(there's more)

Dutch Udder Craft Ice Cream opening Troy storefront

Dutch Udder Troy storefront pre-opening 2017-April

A quick mention relevant to your ice cream interests: The Dutch Udder Craft Ice Cream is opening a storefront in downtown Troy at 282 River St. (It's the spot on the corner with the Franklin Street alley near the Market Block.) The opening is planned for May, according to the company's Facebook page.

The people behind Dutch Udder are Kehmally Karl and Jeff McCauley, who started the business as a side project and now have a commercial kitchen space in Cohoes. They've been building the business methodically, developing new flavors and selling ice cream from a cart at events and pop-ups. (You might remember they were finalists in the 2015 AOA Startup Grant contest.)

We've sampled their ice creams and sorbets on multiple occasions and they're very good. An example: They make a Nine Pin cider sorbet that's really smooth and nice.

We're hoping to get a few more details about what's in store for the Troy location.

Earlier on AOA: Follow up: The Dutch Udder Craft Ice Cream

Pinkster at Crailo State Historic Site

crailo state historic site tile logoThe Crailo State Historic Site in Rensselaer has a Pinkster celebration this Saturday. Pinkster?

Once a Dutch holiday commemorating Pentecost, Pinkster became a distinctly African American holiday in the Hudson River Valley during the colonial era. During the 17th and 18th centuries, enslaved and free African Americans transformed Pinkster from a Dutch religious observance into a spring festival and a celebration of African cultural traditions. All along the Hudson River and on Albany's "Pinkster Hill" (the current site of the NYS Capitol), enslaved African Americans reunited with family and friends and celebrated Pinkster with storytelling, food, music, and dance. Other Pinkster traditions, like the selection of the Pinkster King, created opportunities for enslaved African Americans to honor respected members of the community and to subtly mock their white enslavers.

The Crailo event will have presentations about the experienced enslaved African Americans in New York, an instrument-making workshop, storytelling, and culinary historian and hearth cooking specialist Lavada Nahon interpreting historic African and African-American foodways.

The event is Saturday, April 22 from 11 am to 4 pm. Admission is free.

The Crailo site was once a home for the Van Rensselaer family and now serves as a museum of colonial Dutch history in the Hudson Valley. It was named after the Van Rensselaer's estate in the Netherlands -- Crayloo or Cralo -- which meant "crows' wood" in Dutch.

Talking about the motivation for the March for Science in Albany

inaugurate resistance women's march albany 2017 january

From the women's march in Albany in January. "I was very excited after seeing the momentum after the women's march in Albany, so I wanted to get involved," said Jessica Reichard, one of the organizers of the upcoming Albany march for science.

The presidential election has stirred a lot of people to take action or speak up in ways that maybe they haven't in the past, prompting new connections and organizing.

The next example is this Saturday, when there will be a March for Science in DC and cities around the country, including here in Albany. The mission statement for the local event:

• Promote scientific education for both adults and children
• Increase communication between scientists and the community
• See how government and scientists can work together
• Join with the National March to demonstrate the public support worldwide for evidence-based policies

The Facebook page for the event in West Capitol Park and subsequent march has almost 2,000 people marked as planning to go.

"One of the things that I've found most remarkable is the way our group has formed organically," said Jessica Reichard, an engineer and one of the organizers of the Albany event, this week. "None of us knew each other before organizing this -- we just connected on Facebook and it just kind of took on a life of its own with a lot of passionate people."

Here's a quick chat with Reichard about the motivation for the event in Albany and the intersection of science and politics...

(there's more)

"If they can do it, why can't we?"

Over at the Daily Gazette, Indiana Nash recently talked with the founders of Ballston Spa-based fitness wear company Greater Than Sports about taking inspiration from Coco Chanel and how they ended up making their products in Ballston Spa warehouse. [Daily Gazette]

Walking tours of Schenectady, scandalous and otherwise

Lawrence statue in The Stockade Schenectady

The upcoming slate of Schenectady walking tours organized by the Schenectady County Historical Society is out -- and it includes a "Scandalous Schenectady" tour June 6:

From bootleggers to brothels, Schenectady's Stockade is no stranger to scandal. Join us for a walking tour of Schenectady's sordid moments, and stay late for a drink special at the reputed Stockade Inn!

The full schedule is below -- tour topics include architecture, African-American history, Jewish history, and pre-revolution history.

SCHS also has more of its popular "Secret Stockade" tours planned for the summer months (details at that link above).

(there's more)

Witnesses testify in UAlbany bus incident, testimony begins in Lake George boat crash trial, Anderson announces mayoral bid, letters from 1940s Albany

UAlbany bus trial
Jurors saw video of the UAlbany bus incident on Wednesday and heard from some of the people who recorded video of the altercation on their phones. Witnesses who testified said they could not tell if the fight was racially motivated. One juror had to be replaced by an alternate after he fell asleep twice during testimony, was an hour late to court on Wednesday, and two deputies had to bring him to the courthouse. [TU][TWCN][WNYT]

Lake George boat trial
Jurors in the trial of Alexander West on Wednesday heard the 911 tape from the night of the boat crash that killed 8-year-old Charlotte McCue in July of last year. They also heard testimony from McCue's step-grandmother in the case. In her opening statements, Warren County DA Kate Hogan said West drank throughout the day and snorted cocaine prior to the crash. [TU][Gazette][TWCN]


CDPHP in-post ad 17-3075 Insights Online Ad 525x80

NinePin525inpost.jpg

(there's more)

Looking for more? Check out the archive. Or try searching for it:

The Scoop

Ever wish you had a smart, savvy friend with the inside line on what's happening around the Capital Region? You know, the kind of stuff that makes your life just a little bit better? Yeah, we do, too. That's why we created All Over Albany. Find out more.

Recent Comments

I feel that when people don't confront inappropriate behavior it sends a signal that it is tolerated. I often speak up in situations like these, depending on my reading of the situation. If we consider ourselves part of a community we all have a role to play in signaling what is and isn't appropriate behavior.

Where the new homes have been built

...has 1 comment, most recently from chezjake

How should we respond when someone is being clearly inappropriate in public?

...has 14 comments, most recently from Stan

Drawing: Champagne on the Park 2017

...has 93 comments, most recently from kriskaten

"People talk about the beer like it's got f------ unicorns in it."

...has 2 comments, most recently from ace

Pinkster at Crailo State Historic Site

...has 1 comment, most recently from Fionn