Poll: almost half of New Yorkers "disappointed" by same-sex marriage vote

Thumbnail image for NYS Capitol from ESPSo reports the Siena poll out today.

When asked if they were "pleased" or "disappointed" by the state Senate's rejection of the same-sex marriage vote, 47 percent of respondents said they were disappointed (41 percent said they were pleased).

The poll also asked people whether they would like to change the current system in which state legislators can have outside jobs (perhaps this question was prompted by the Joe Bruno trial). Sixty-three percent of respondents said they favored "changing the system" (31 percent said they favored keeping the same).

Of those people who said they wanted to change the system, 43 percent said they wanted legislators to "publicly disclose the size and source of their outside income." Twenty-six percent said they'd like to see legislators prohibited from having other jobs -- with no pay increase. And 23 percent say they'd like to see legislators prohibited from outside jobs -- but with a pay raise.

Here are the results broken down by demographic categories.

Comments

Who isn't disappointed by any thing the Senate does? In response to that question I would have answered Disappointed too.

A whole 41% were subhuman, hateful degenerates who were pleased with the Senate's marriage equality vote!? How sad.

Well now Senate Republicans can't say they have the majority on their side; they don't.

@Elisass, careful with your name calling. That’s my mother you are talking about.
Here’s the most troubling part of the survey.
1. African Americans were 60% opposed
2. Protestants were 55% opposed
3. People aged 55+ were 56% opposed.
Candidly, if this legislation is ever to pass, these groups must be reached out to in a meaningful and sensitive manner, not castigated as “subhuman, hateful degenerates.” That approach only fosters intransigence.

Of those who RESPONDED. Who can be bothered?

Put it to a referendum, and you will see much higher
numbers opposed...which is why they will not do so.

The vast majority of actual citizens of New York will
not support the institutionalization of perversion, and
one can 'slice and dice' all one wishes, but that ratio
will never change. And, Paterson on that side is the
sure, and certain, kiss of death, as well. All the gays
are accomplishing is building anger, and resentment.

If they keep pushing their 'agenda', there will be more.
Guaranteed.

Justin, of COURSE there will be more. As is the case in any situation of social injustice when civil rights are denied.

@thisjustin: Sorry to hear that your mother opposes basic human rights for a portion of our population. It must hurt you deeply to know that Mom is so backwards in her viewpoints.

However, any attempt to claim that those who responded "no" to the survey are NOT “subhuman, hateful degenerates", as Ellsass put it, is negated by comments like Justin Stark's right below yours. What motivation would 41% of the state's population have to oppose gay marriage if not hate?

There is plenty of hate in both Ellsass' comment and Justin Stark's. Tim's is insulting to anyone who has ever held different viewpoints than other members of their family. Oh wait, that's everyone.

Indulging in these attitudes does not bring our society any closer to social justice. Only a greater understanding of the human rights issue at stake can do that. Gay marriage is a relatively new idea to some, and it takes people a while to get on board. When is the last time you boarded a bus that had someone hanging out the window screaming insults at you?


It's not hate, Sweetheart, it's reality.

Yes, unfortunately bigotry IS reality. That doesn't mean I want it hanging round much longer, but sadly for some, it will never go away.

Merry Christmas, Everybody!

@Tim, while I disagree with mom on this (and many other) issues, I still love and respect her, and I will defend her from anyone’s hostility.

She does not “hate” gay people. I doubt she even knows anyone who is openly gay. The point of my post was that in order to achieve acceptance, it’s imperative to reach out to and convert potential allies from among those who currently may disagree with you. Civil rights icons like MLK and Ghandi knew this.

I’m suggesting the better use of your energy would be to approach people like my mom, and ask what concerns they have about gay marriage. You have no idea what her thoughts are; you just assume it’s hatred. The fact that you would be considerate enough to ask will get you a better result than calling an elderly lady “degenerate.”

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