New York State farm cideries

This list is via the Cuomo admin. A few quick notes:

+ It looks like a few of these operations are not (yet) offering products to public, or at least, not publicizing them online. So check the websites before visiting.

+ This isn't a comprehensive list of hard cider producers in the state. For example: Beek & Skiff near Syracuse produces a line of hard ciders (and other products) called 1911. But it doesn't appear on this list because it's licensed as a farm winery, according the NYS Liquor Authority's online license directory. Or another example: Indian Ladder Farms has a brewery and cidery that operates under a farm brewer license.

+ Here's a wider directory of cideries (both hard and soft) around the state, from the NY Apple Association.

New York's farm cideries

fermentation tanks at Nine Pin

Fermentation tanks at Nine Pin in Albany.

The hard cider industry in New York continues to fizz -- there are now 24 farm cideries around the state, according to the Cuomo admin. That's up from eight in 2014, when the farm cidery law took effect.

Farm cidery? It's a type of license issued by the state that smooths out some of the regulations and requirements for running a cidery -- if the operation uses New York State apples to make its products. (There are also farm winery and farm brewery license.) The state's first farm cidery was Nine Pin Cider Works in Albany's Warehouse District.

Of course, the requirement to use New York apples isn't too much of a hurdle. The Empire State is the nation's #2 producer of apples, behind only Washington State. So the hard cider industry is another way to make use of the state's abundant crop.

Given the growth in the number of farm cideries, we figured it'd be fun to roll together a map of where they're located around the state.

Let's have a look...

Look up for the map

It's above in large format -- click or scroll all the way up.

____

Nine Pin advertises on AOA.

Comments

Is there a reason Indian Ladder is not on the map? I just had their dry hard cider and it's fabulous.

@chrisck: There is -- Indian Ladder isn't operating under a farm cidery license, so it wasn't on this particular list. There's an explanation above the map.

The map would have been better if I had pulled all the places making hard cider -- regardless of license type. (I was just crunched for time, and the fact that this particular type of license seems to be giving rise to all these new cideries seemed noteworthy by itself.)

@chrisck: Last summer, I stumbled (hehe) into a cider tasting room on Cayuga Lake and got talking with the pourer about the various farm alcohol legislation and licenses. She told me that a lot of the cideries in the Finger Lakes, at the time, were opting for the farm winery license as it gave them more latitude and flexibility. (I would imagine that many, like Indian Ladder, that hold a farm brewery license, did so for similar reasons.)

I believe upgrades to the legislation this past session addressed some of those concerns, but my guess is most of the already-established cideries aren't going to swap out their licenses at this point.

Get this: there is a "cider focused restaurant and bar" in New York City called Wassail. It is aptly located on Orchard Street on the Lower East Side. A truly amazing selection of local (New York) and other North American and European hard ciders.

http://www.wassailnyc.com/drink/

Psst: It's Beak like on a bird. And 1911 is pretty tasty, too.

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