new_york_state_measles_cases_graph_big.jpg

Measles in New York, before and after the vaccine

graph of measles incidence in New York State 1928-2011

With all the news about the recent upswing in measles cases -- and the all discussions about kids not being vaccinated -- we had been curious about details regarding how a big a difference the measles vaccine made when it was introduced.

A recent Wall Street Journal data visualization illustrates this before/after across the country beautifully. It's based on numbers collected and organized by Project Tycho, a health data project at the University of Pittsburgh.

Project Tycho includes data for many states, including New York. So we pulled out the data for measles cases in New York State between 1928 and 2011. There's a graph above.

There's a bigger version after the jump, along with a few notes.

Larger graph

It's above -- click or scroll all the way up.

A few notes

+ As mentioned, this data is from the Tycho Project at the University of Pittsburgh, based on reports published by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It's the number of cases per 100,000 people each week. And some weeks there's no data included. (That's one of the limitations of the graph above -- these no-data weeks look like weeks in which 0 cases were officially reported.)

+ To put some of these numbers in perspective, take a look at that big spike of cases in 1941. The incidence of measles in New York State peaked at more than 66 cases per 100,000 people in March of that year. For the entire year, New York State's measles case count was reported at almost 105,000.

+ The number of cases drops dramatically after the introduction of the vaccine. But there are a few noticeable blips, the latest of which was in 1990 and 1991. There was an outbreak in New York City those years, largely among unvaccinated children (some of them recent immigrants), according to CDC reports and official statements from the time. Over the two years there were more than 5,000 reported cases and 24 deaths.

+ Up until the recent outbreak in California, there had been very cases of measles reported in the United States. Since 2001, many years had fewer than 100 reported cases for the entire country. The count was more than 600 last year.

[WSJ article via @CathleenCrowley]

Comments

Thank you for always providing visuals of data for us visual learners, AOA.

Say Something!

We'd really like you to take part in the conversation here at All Over Albany. But we do have a few rules here. Don't worry, they're easy. The first: be kind. The second: treat everyone else with the same respect you'd like to see in return. Cool? Great, post away. Comments are moderated so it might take a little while for your comment to show up. Thanks for being patient.

The Scoop

Ever wish you had a smart, savvy friend with the inside line on what's happening around the Capital Region? You know, the kind of stuff that makes your life just a little bit better? Yeah, we do, too. That's why we created All Over Albany. Find out more.

Recently on All Over Albany

Morning Blend

Fatal Saratoga County fire A mother and daughter died in a house fire in Corinth Monday morning. Three other people, including two young children, were... (more)

As it turns out, Tucker Carlson's understanding of Albany demographics is lacking

Summer noticed something during Kathy Sheehan's appearance Fox News last week about the "sanctuary" status of cities that stuck out to us, too: Clearly Tucker... (more)

Novel canids

Here's an interesting AP story about how eastern coyotes -- that is, the kind we have in this area -- are becoming wolflike. "It's especially... (more)

Empire Pass Card 2018 sale

New York State parks are currently on sale. OK, to be more specific, passes to New York State parks are now on sale. The 2018... (more)

The 46ers set to make its local debut on WMHT

That documentary about the Adirondack High Peaks and the people who hike them -- The 46ers -- is set to run on WMHT December 4... (more)

Recent Comments

I'm glad to see people involved in community decisions. But at the same time, we can't just keep saying we want development "somewhere else" or "not in my backyard!". Having mini-suburbs in the city of Albany was feasible at one point in time, and now development is catching up. ...

Novel canids

...has 2 comments, most recently from ace

As it turns out, Tucker Carlson's understanding of Albany demographics is lacking

...has 10 comments, most recently from Greg

The crows -- and crow trucks -- are returning to Albany

...has 6 comments, most recently from Jeff D

Private dorm opposition, a big downtown residential conversion, and other exciting tales of the Albany Planning Board

...has 5 comments, most recently from Kman518

The week ahead

...has 1 comment, most recently from Fionn MacCoul