They haven't gone bald yet

bald eagle chicks NYSDEC

That pic above is a pair of bald eagle chicks that biologists from the state Department of Environmental Conservation recently banded in Albany County. From a DEC Facebook post:

Using band data, DEC biologists can track the birds age, movement and dispersal activity. The silver band is a federal ID band that is tracked by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) while the blue band is a New York State ID band.
From a distance you can sometimes see the colored band and at least know that that bird was born in New York. With a good spotting scope it's also possible to read the letter and two digit number code when the bird is perched. That data can be reported to DEC biologists and we can track their movement.

That link above includes more photos of the chicks and their nest.

Bald eagle populations had been almost entirely wiped out in New York State by the 1960s, in part because of an insecticide called DDT that weakened the shells of birds of prey. (Museum specimen collections such as the one at the New York State Museum helped biologist figure that out.) The pesticide was banned in the early 1970s. And in 1976 a program aimed at re-establishing bald eagles in New York State started relocating young eagles from other parts of the county, and it helped rebuild the population in the state -- and it's still growing.

Earlier on AOA: What, your job doesn't involve baby bears?

photo: NYS DEC

Comments

I bet the person who climbs up to those nests has some stories to tell.

Dinosaurs!

Say Something!

We'd really like you to take part in the conversation here at All Over Albany. But we do have a few rules here. Don't worry, they're easy. The first: be kind. The second: treat everyone else with the same respect you'd like to see in return. Cool? Great, post away. Comments are moderated so it might take a little while for your comment to show up. Thanks for being patient.

What's All Over Albany?

All Over Albany is for interested and interesting people in New York's Capital Region. In other words, it's for you. It's kind of like having a smart, savvy friend who can help you find out what's up. Oh, and our friends call us AOA.

Search

Recently on All Over Albany

Ghosts on a street that no longer exists

The photo above is looking east along Hudson Ave near Swan Street in Albany in (we're guessing) the 1920s. And it's from the Albany Public... (more)

Albany City Hall on the Road 2018 summer/fall

The city of Albany is starting a new round of "City Hall on the Road" events in the evening at various locations in the evening... (more)

There's a new type of tick in New York State

There's a new type of tick in New York, the state Department of Health announced Tuesday: Haemaphysalis longicornis -- the "longhorned tick." DOH says it... (more)

Repair Cafe Schenectady returns

The Schenectady County Public Library will again be hosting a Repair Café this Saturday. Repair Café? Blurbage: Repair Café is a neighborhood initiative that... (more)

Block party at Franklin Alley Social Club

The Franklin Alley Social Club in Troy will be closing down its namesake alley this Friday, July 20 for luau-themed block party. Blurbage: Come through... (more)

Recent Comments

Wish they open the old McCormick road between Albany and Bethlehem for walkers and bikers so more people would have access to the trail from the Westmere, Albany, and Guilderland side.

Ghosts on a street that no longer exists

...has 3 comments, most recently from Greg

Repair Cafe Schenectady returns

...has 1 comment, most recently from Sam

Maybe all those new apartments are starting to have some effect on rents

...has 10 comments, most recently from Peter

There's a new type of tick in New York State

...has 2 comments, most recently from Peter

A few more bits about the present and future of the Helderberg-Hudson Rail Trail

...has 12 comments, most recently from Daleyplanit