Albany County

Rensselaer County

Saratoga County

Schenectady County

Capital Region elementary school test scores 2011

chalk on chalk board ledgeThe state Education Department released results from the English and math proficiency tests for grades 3-8 this week. NYSED reports that, on average, scores are down slightly for English and about the same for math.

The state also makes the test score data available by school district, so we pulled out the results for Capital Region districts. A compact, easy-skim version is after the jump -- along with expanded presentations of the data -- after the jump...

The numbers below indicate the percent of students in each school district that scored at a level considered to meet or exceed the standard (level 3 or 4). NYSED changed these "cut scores" last year to make it harder to score at those levels.

Grade-by-grade numbers for each district are embedded above. (scroll all the way up)

If you want a school-by-school breakdown, NYSED makes that available, too.

Albany County

Rensselaer County

Saratoga County

Schenectady County

Capital Region test scores from 2010.

All data via NYSED.

Summaries of state-wide data

A few things about this year's statewide data that NYSED noted today:

Summary of 3-8 Exam Results
+ 52.8% of grade 3-8 students across the state met or exceeded the ELA proficiency standard (a decrease from 53.2% last year); 63.3% met or exceeded the standard in math (up from 61% last year).
+ 12.6% of English Language Learners (ELLs) statewide met or exceeded the new ELA proficiency standard (down from 14.3% last year) across grades 3-8; 32.3% of ELLs met or exceeded the standard in math (up from 30.7% last year).
+ Statewide results for black students reveal the persistence of the achievement gap: 35% of black students across grades 3-8 met or exceeded the ELA proficiency standard (compared with 52.8% for all students and 64.2% for white students); 44% met or exceeded the standard in math (compared with 63.3% for all students and 73.3% for white students).
+ Statewide results for Hispanic students reveal the persistence of the achievement gap: 37.2% of Hispanic students across grades 3-8 met or exceeded the ELA proficiency standard (compared with 52.8% for all students and 64.2% for white students); 50.2% met or exceeded the standard in math (compared with 63.3% for all students and 73.3% for white students).
+ 14.5% of Students with Disabilities (SWDs) statewide met or exceeded the new ELA proficiency standard (down from 15.2% last year) across grades 3-8; 26.9% of SWDs met or exceeded the standard in math (up from 24.6% last year).
+ The percentage of students scoring at Level 4 in both ELA and math decreased statewide. On the ELA exam, 3.5% of students across grades 3-8 combined scored at Level 4 (down from 10.2% last year). In math, 23% scored at Level 4 (down from 24.7% last year).


Earlier on AOA: Capital Region high school graduation rates 2010


photo: Flickr user Kyle McCluer

Comments

In your face, Troy! Albany r better at English and Maths!

Dear Tim,
Your comment should read" Albany IS( not are) better at English and Math!" Albany is singular and takes a singular, not a plural,verb. If you're going to gloat about your skills, at least use them. ( I am not from Albany, by the way.)

So what do these scores really tell us? What don't they tell us?
They tell us that the affluent areas-typically suburban-do better than the less affluent-typically urban-schools do.
These scores tell us NOTHING discernible about the teachers who work in these schools; factor in that the teachers at Niskayuna have the same or similar training as those at Schenectady or Albany or some other low-performer and it is pretty obvious that the teaching staffs at these schools aren't causing the lower performances.

Testing itself is a gimmick, and for two reasons. First, testing, for what seems to be the millionth time, only demonstrates one kind of knowledge--the knowledge for the test, NOT the development of the other skills that schooling imparts (judgment, socialization, understanding values). In short, it is static knowledge that doesn't show any ability on the part of the student to apply it, much less truly understand why they are learning it.

Second--and more nefariously--"testing" is part of the agenda, now national in scope, that seeks to discredit the Public education of Americans. If public schools are sufficiently discredited, then what, pray tell, will fill in the vacuum? Charter schools that aim to make profits for their stockholders and those who administer them. Sure, right now a charter school can claim that they cost less per pupil, but give it time and let the public schools evaporate, and watch as the charter schools jack-up the price on the public dime.

It isn't just a "Republican" thing anymore (although they tend to be pushier in these matters), it is also a "Democrat" thing as well. Most Democrats have bought into privatizing education (and everything else for that matter), and cannot be distinguished from Republicans.

The real problem is that schools are being asked to solve society's problems: broken homes, poor or non-existent discipline, subcultures that do not value education (in fairness, it isn't entirely irrational to place one's esteem elsewhere under certain living conditions), and the belief that things cannot possible change, so why bother anyhow?

Schools cannot solve these problems, and, quite frankly, the corruption that has begun at the top for the past several decades with our most affluent citizens has seeped into the bowels of the body-politic--the citizenry. These problems may not be solvable and, unfortunately, may need to run their course to work themselves out.

We just sold our house & are in the process of moving out of Albany. This will be the first time in my life I won't be living in this city. And the reason why is that my son will be starting school in less than two years, and I don't want to send him to Albany schools. Albany High was bad when I was there in the 1990s, and it's only gotten worse. The AHS graduation rate is now under 50%. That's nuts.

People have argued that if I'm involved with my sons education, Albany schools aren't that bad. However, I don't want him to be in an envriorment where involved parents are a novelty. Because I believe this reflects a larger society problem, not a faculty problem. And if I thought I stood a chance of improving things, I'd stay. But the problem is just too large. I don't want my sons education to suffer if it doesn't have to. That's why I'm bailing.

I understand this is a controvercial topic. And I certainly respect parents who decide to keep their kids in Albany and fight the good fight. I'd ask that they respect our choices too.

Not that it matters, but I understand where "Mother load" is coming from...But what do we in the City of Albany do?

If a child makes it into the advanced courses at Albany High, it is a very different school than if they are in regular regents courses--and for the better. Nonetheless, all students are still forced to walk in halls where civility is a novelty (not to mention an unknown word and concept). The athletics department combats this to some extent because team sports force cooperation across racial and class lines, but where else does this occur? Certainly not the lunch room(s), which have an unusual tendency in this post-racial America to self-segregate. Cafeterias, apparently, failed to get the memo.

The schools need to begin experimenting with community-building within the school, making students dependent on one another, making students see each other as people worthy of basic decency and respect, rather than as predators to be avoided and prey to be caught.

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